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Some of the films mentioned on the site don't exist anymore for the "general public", but there are still some little know manufacturers whose production is quite limited, and whose films can be bought online from their distributors. See my section "Where can I find films?"

Disc
Film 110
Film 118
Film 120
Film 122
Film 126
Film 127
Film 135
Film 616
Film 620
Cartouche Rapid
Sx-70
APS
Film Eljy (Lumière)
Film Hit
Film 00
Film 828 (Bantam)
Film Steky
Polaroid 600
Autres ...


118 Film: This film was introduced in 1900, it allows to obtain 8 x 10.5 cm negatives. Strangely, I found it in a 101 Film Camera (9 x 9cm).


Film




135 Film (24 x 36mm): Introduced by Kodak in 1934 under its present form of a disposable cartridge. Previously, Leica and Contax used this film, but in refillable cartridges.  
Film


Rapid Cartridge: Agfa system. The cartridge contains 35mm film. The supply spool and the takeup spool are identical, avoiding to rewinding the film at the end. Those cartridges have no axes, the camera push the film in the takeup spool. A metal tab located below the cartridge has a different length according to the sensitivity of the film, which automatically adjusts the camera. This loader existed in 24 views (18x24), or 18 views
(24x24) or 12 views (24x36).


Rapid



126 Film: Introduced by Kodak in 1963 (Photokina 63), following the observation that many clients using the 135, always asked to their retailer to put the film in the camera, to be sure it would be "hooked" (thank you Alain). The 35mm film (28 x 28) being a rigid cartridge, including the  takeup spool, the supply spool and the film guide, joined together. The holes in the film of 126 cartridge are different from those of 35 mm film (135). An aperture at the back and center of the cartridge allow to read the number of the current view. The cameras using this type of film had to have a transparent window at the back. Kodak stopped to producing the 126 Film in 1999.


Film



110 Film: Introduced by Kodak in 1972 following the logic of the 126 cartridge. This cartridge contains 16mm film (13 x 17).


Film

Film


127 Film (4 x 6,5 cm): Introduced by Kodak in 1912, stopped in 1995. 




Film




Disc: Introduced by Kodak in 1982, stopped in 1998. Views of 8 x 10mm. 


Film
Konica SR-V



620 Film (6 x 9 cm): Introduced by Kodak in 1931 (or 32), to replace the 120 Film (which it never disappear, because it always exist). The materials at this time allow to make smaller holes axes. No longer exists today. Find the odd!


Film



Format 120 (6 x 9 cm) : lancé en 1901 . A l'époque les axes de bobines étant en bois, il n'était pas possible d'y faire de petits trous.


Film


Film
A gauche, le 620. A droite, un 120.



Format 616 : lancé en 1932 par Kodak en remplacement du 116 (6,5 x 11 cm).


Film



SX-70 : Photo instantanée 79 x 79 mm. Film 150 ISO. Aux USA, s'appelle actuellement Time-Zero.

Film


Polaroid 600 : Photo instantanée 78x72 mm. Film 640 ISO. Pour les Polaroid 600, 635, 636, Coolcam, Impulse etc....

Polaroid 500 : Photo instantanée 72 x 54 mm. Film 640 ISO. Pour les Joycam.

Polaroid Spectra : Photo instantanée 92 x 73 mm. Film 640 ISO. Pour les appareils de la série Image (Spectra)

Polaroid Izone Pocket Film : Photo instantanée 37 x 25 mm. Film 640 ISO. Existe sur support autocollant. Pour tous les modèles d'Izone

Film APS :

APS



Film Eljy (Lumière) :

Eljy

Format 122 (8,5 x 14 cm)

Film 122





Film 00 (Universal)


Film 00

Film 828 Bantam :

Bantam

Film Hit :

Hit

Film Steky :

steky



Autres :

Format 102 (4 x 5 cm)

Format 121 (4 x 6,5 cm)

Format 117 (6 x 6 cm)

Format 105 ( 6 x 9 cm)

Format 118 (8 x 10,5 cm)

Format 130 ( 7,25 x 12,5 cm)

Format 119 (10,5 x 8 cm)

Format 124 (8 x 10,5 cm)


Format 123 (10 x 12,5 cm)

Format 103 (10 x 12,5 cm)

Format 104 (12,5 x 10 cm)

Format 126 (10,5 x 16,5 cm)

Format 128 (4 x 5 cm)

Format 129 (5 x 8 cm)

  • UK English version
    Some details about films…

    Some of films evoked below do not exist any more for the “general public”, but there exist still some manufacturers little known whose production is restricted enough, and whose films can be bought online in their dealers.
    Consult my section “Where to find film?”.








    Format 118: This film was launched in 1900. It makes it possible to obtain negative 8 x 10.5 cm. Strangely, I found it in a camera with format 101 (9 x 9 cm).




    Format 135 (24 X 36 mm): launched by Kodak in 1934 on current form of a disposable cartridge. Beforehand Leica and Contax used this film well, but in rechargeable cartridges.




    Rapid cartridge] Agfa system. The cartridge contains film 35 mm. The debit reel and the receiving reel are identical, which avoids rewinding in film end. The cartridges do not have axle, it is the camera which pushes the film in the receiving reel. A metal strip located under the cartridge has a different length according to the sensitivity of film contained, which makes it possible to adjust the camera automatically.
    This magazine existed in 24 exposures 18x24, or 18 exposures 24x24 or 12 exposures 24x36.




    Format 126: Launched by Kodak in 1963 (Photokina 63), following the observation that several customers using the 135, always asked to their retailer to load the film in the camera to be sure that it “would be hang well” (thank you Alain). Film 35 mm (28 x 28) being appeared in rigid cartridge, including the receiving reel, the debit reel and the film guide, solidarized. The perforations of film of cartridges 126 are different from those of films 35 mm (135).
    An opening to the back and the centre of the cartridge makes it possible to read the n° of the exposure in progress. The cameras using this kind of film were to thus have a transparent window with the back. Kodak stopped the production of the 126 in 1999.




    Format 110: Launched by Kodak in 1972 following the principle of cartridge 126. This cartridge contains film 16 mm with the format 13 x 17.




    Format 127 (4 x 6.5 cm): Launched by Kodak in 1912, stopped in 1995.
     




    Disc:  Launched in 1982, stopped in 1998. Views of 8 x 10 mm.




    Konica SR-V




    Format 620 (6 x 9 cm): Launched by Kodak in 1931 (or 32), to replace the 120 (which did not disappear besides since there still exists). The materials of the time make it possible to make smaller holes of axle. Do not exist today any more.




    Format 120 (6 x 9 cm): Launched in 1901. At the time the axles of reels being out of wood, it was not possible to make small holes there.




    On the left, 620. On the right, one 120.




    Format 616: Launched in 1932 by Kodak to replace the 116 (6.5 x 11 cm).






    SX-70: Instantaneous photography 79 x 79 mm. Film 150 ISO. In the USA, is currently called Time-Zero.




    Polaroid 600: Instantaneous photography 78 x 72 mm. Film 640 ISO. Still distributed in 2003. For Polaroid 600,635,636, Coolcam, Impulse etc….


    Polaroid 500: Instantaneous photography 72 x 54 mm. Film 640 ISO. Still distributed in 2003. For Joycam.




    Spectra polaroid: Instantaneous photography 92 x73 mm. Film 640 ISO. Still distributed in 2003. For the Image (Spectra).


    Polaroid Izone Pocket Film: Instantaneous photography 37 x 25 mm. Film 640 ISO. Still distributed in 2003. Exist on self-adhesive support. For all the models of Izone




    Film APS:




    Film Eljy (Lumière):




    Format 122 (8.5 x 14 cm)










    Film 00 (Universal)






    Film 828 Bantam:






    Film Hit:






    Steky Film:








    Others:


    Format 102 (4 x 5 cm)


    Format 121 (4 x 6.5 cm)


    Format 117 (6 x 6 cm)


    Format 105 (6 x 9 cm)


    Format 118 (8 x 10.5 cm)


    Format 130 (7.25 x 12.5 cm)


    Format 119 (10.5 x 8 cm)


    Format 124 (8 x 10.5 cm)




    Format 123 (10 x 12.5 cm)


    Format 103 (10 x 12.5 cm)


    Format 104 (12.5 x 10 cm)


    Format 126 (10.5 x 16.5 cm)


    Format 128 (4 x 5 cm)


    Format 129 (5 x 8 cm)









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